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Baby Born at 35 Weeks: Does giving birth involve risks to the fetus?

Baby Born at 35 Weeks: Does giving birth involve risks to the fetus?

The limit of prematurity is established at 37 weeks of gestation. However, 7% of newborns are born earlier, usually after 32 weeks. Not only the gestational age counts, but also the weight at birth. So what are the risks if your baby born at 35 weeks?

 

 
For some mothers with preterm contractions, twin pregnancy, sack rupture, cervical incontinence, previous preterm birth 37 weeks seems an unattainable goal. And who knows these situations also knows the anguish that brings with it the unfortunate hypothesis of giving birth to its newborn when it is still a premature, therefore not fully ready and able to survive life, to breathe independently, to feed, to keep ‘thermal homeostasis and to defend against infections.

 

Baby Born at 35 Weeks
Baby Born at 35 Weeks

In these cases the numbers become law. Survival rates, week limits, and higher-rated hospitals for neonatal intensive care. But it must be said that the limit set at 37 weeks is based on statistical calculations, not absolute truths. Your 35-week-old baby may break out of health, just as the date of the pregnancy itself may be false compared to the actual date of conception, which may have occurred a week before or a week later.

 

 

If the numbers can reassure us we can instead say that a newborn born between 35 and 37 weeks is defined as a late premature and not a serious premature like those born between 28 and 30 weeks. But in addition to the gestational age, weight is also important. Today it is estimated that thanks to the intensive care that is offered in the III level hospitals, more than 90% of premature babies survive if its weight is between 1 kg and 1.5 kg, beyond 70% it survives with a weight below one kg, while over 1.5kg survival is guaranteed in almost all premature babies.

 

 

In terms of weeks, however, over 26 weeks of gestation today the prognosis is generally good, so in conclusion a newborn of 35 weeks weighing more than 1.5kg should not present major problems, and probably could also be able to suck at the breasts, or in any case certainly will not need parenteral feeding (unless serious congenital defects of the digestive system). However, it will be kept under control in neonatal intensive care, in an incubator as per protocol. So in view of a preterm birth it is advisable to choose a hospital that can offer the highest levels of this assistance.

 

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